Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Podiatr Med Surg. 2010 Oct;27(4):547-60. doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2010.06.005. Epub 2010 Jul 22.

The Lisfranc joint.

Author information

1
Private Practice - Alamo Family Foot & Ankle Care, San Antonio, TX, USA. marty.chaney@gmail.com

Abstract

The Lisfranc joint encompasses 6 articulations, weak dorsal ligaments, and strong plantar ligaments. The Lisfranc ligament serves to secure the second metatarsal in the keystone of the midfoot. Traumatic ligament injury and fracture can result in deformity, instability, pain, and degenerative joint disease of the Lisfranc joint. Increased awareness of Lisfranc joint anatomy and advanced imaging has allowed more accurate diagnosis and treatment of this injured joint complex. Nontraumatic degenerative joint disease can also result from congenital and acquired deformity such as first ray insufficiency, abnormal metatarsal parabola, and equinus. Open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) demands accurate anatomic alignment to prevent the need for salvage arthrodesis. Early studies have shown that primary arthrodesis of the medial 3 rays has performed equally well or better than ORIF for the displaced primarily ligamentous and severe injuries. A paradigm shift may emerge as more studies favor primary arthrodesis.

PMID:
20934104
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpm.2010.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center