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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Nov;19(11):2001-9. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2010.2152. Epub 2010 Oct 7.

Healthcare utilization in women diagnosed with hypoactive sexual desire disorder: interim baseline results from the HSDD Registry for Women.

Author information

1
New England Research Institutes, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts 02472, USA. nmaserejian@neriscience.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate treatment seeking and utilization of women diagnosed with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in the clinical setting.

METHODS:

We used interim baseline data from the ongoing HSDD Registry for Women (n = 724, enrolled at 27 clinical sites across the United States in 2008-2009). The recent diagnosis of generalized, acquired HSDD was confirmed by clinician's administration of the validated diagnostic Decreased Sexual Desire Screener. Treatment-seeking behavior was categorized as formal (discussion with a healthcare provider or use of off-label prescription treatment for HSDD) or informal/none (over-the-counter products, anonymous media, or no help seeking).

RESULTS:

Over half (n = 386, 53%) of these women with clinically diagnosed HSDD had not sought formal healthcare for their decreased sexual desire problem. Among formal healthcare seekers, 36% remained untreated, whereas 64% received some form of treatment. The most common treatments reported were nonprescription lubricants or arousal creams (36%) and off-label prescription medications (20%). Women were more likely to have sought formal help if they were married/cohabiting, were postmenopausal, had private health insurance, had > 5 current prescription medications, had depression symptoms, had a longer duration of sexual desire problems, or reported that the partner relationship or sense of femininity/sexual self was threatened by HSDD.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these women with HSDD, less than half had sought healthcare, but of those who had sought healthcare, almost two thirds received some form of treatment. Regardless of treatment-seeking behavior, most women had a strong desire to "feel like a normal person again" regarding sexuality, which was the most common motivating factor for treatment seeking.

PMID:
20929408
DOI:
10.1089/jwh.2010.2152
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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