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Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Dec;143(4):631-7. doi: 10.1002/ajpa.21404.

Brief Communication: Shape analysis of the MT 1 proximal articular surface in fossil hominins and shod and unshod Homo.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota, MN 55455, USA. dproctor@umn.edu

Abstract

As a follow-up study to Proctor et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol 135 (2008) 216-224), this study quantifies the first metatarsal proximal articular surface using three-dimensional morphometrics to test for differences in articular surface shape between habitually shod and habitually unshod humans. In addition, differences in shape between Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Hylobates are compared to the fossil hominin specimens A. L. 333-54, Stw 562, Stw 573 ("Little Foot"), OH 8, SKX 5017, and SK 1813. No difference in surface shape was found between habitually shod and habitually unshod humans. There is a clear quantitative division in articular surface shape between humans and apes that is more pronounced than a previous study by Proctor et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol 135 (2008) 216-224), due to additional landmarks present in this study. The specimen OH 8 is indistinguishable from modern Homo. The fossils A. L. 333-54, Stw 562, and Stw 573 are intermediate in shape between humans and apes. The specimens SKX 5017 and SK 1813 have a more apelike articular surface. When combined with other characteristics, this trait suggests that Paranthropus used a degree of abduction during locomotion that was much less than that in extant apes, but greater than that in Australopithecus, allowing for some small degree of grasping ability.

PMID:
20925078
DOI:
10.1002/ajpa.21404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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