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Toxicol Pathol. 2010 Dec;38(7):1037-50. doi: 10.1177/0192623310382560. Epub 2010 Oct 5.

Thyroid follicular lesions induced by oral treatment for 2 years with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats.

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1
Pathology II, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and structurally-similar dioxin-like compounds affect thyroid function and morphology and thyroid hormone metabolism in animals and humans. The National Toxicology Program conducted eight 2-year gavage studies in female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats to determine the relative potency of chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of TCDD, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB118), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachloro-biphenyl (PCB153), a tertiary mixture of TCDD/PCB126/PeCDF, and two binary mixtures (PCB126/PCB153 and PCB126/PCB118). Administration of these compounds was associated with increased incidences of thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy, variably observed in the 14-, 31-, and 53-week interim and 2-year sacrifice groups. In all studies, the incidences of follicular cell adenoma and carcinoma were not increased. Decreased levels of serum thyroxine were primarily noted in the 14-or-later -week interim groups of all chemicals. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) levels were increased in the TCDD, PCB126, PeCDF, TCDD/PCB126/PeCDF, and PCB126/PCB153 studies, while decreased levels were noted in the PCB153 and PCB126/PCB118 studies. TCDD, PCB126, PCB126/PCB153, and PCB126/PCB118 increased levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone almost in a dose-dependent manner in the 14-week groups. These data suggest that although dioxin-like compounds alter thyroid hormones and increase follicular cell hyperplasia, there is not an increase in thyroid adenoma or carcinoma in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

PMID:
20924081
DOI:
10.1177/0192623310382560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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