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Public Health Nutr. 2011 Feb;14(2):347-55. doi: 10.1017/S1368980010002466. Epub 2010 Oct 6.

Consumption of whole grains is associated with improved diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

Author information

1
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 261 Knapp Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. coneil1@lsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association of consumption of whole grains (WG) with diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data.

SETTING:

The 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

SUBJECTS:

Children aged 2-5 years (n 2278) and 6-12 years (n 3868) and adolescents aged 13-18 years (n 4931). The participants were divided into four WG consumption groups: ≥ 0 to < 0·6, ≥ 0·6 to < 1·5, ≥ 1·5 to < 3·0 and ≥ 3·0 servings/d. Nutrient intake and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2005, were determined for each group from a single 24 h dietary recall.

RESULTS:

The mean number of servings of WG consumed was 0·45, 0·59 and 0·63 for children/adolescents at the age of 2-5, 6-12 and 13-18 years, respectively. In all groups, HEI and intakes of energy, fibre, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, phosphorus and iron were significantly higher in those consuming ≥ 3·0 servings of WG/d; intakes of protein, total fat, SFA and MUFA and cholesterol levels were lower. Intakes of PUFA (6-12 years), vitamins B1 (2-5 and 13-18 years), B2 (13-18 years), A (2-5 and 13-18 years) and E (13-18 years) were higher in those groups consuming ≥ 3·0 servings of WG/d; intakes of added sugars (2-5 years), vitamin C (2-5 and 6-12 years), potassium and sodium (6-12 years) were lower.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall consumption of WG was low. Children and adolescents who consumed the most servings of WG had better diet quality and nutrient intake.

PMID:
20923597
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980010002466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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