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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011 Feb;165(2):104-11. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.192. Epub 2010 Oct 4.

Maternal influenza vaccination and effect on influenza virus infection in young infants.

Author information

1
Center for American Indian Health, 621 N Washington Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination during pregnancy on laboratory-confirmed influenza in infants to 6 months of age.

DESIGN:

Nonrandomized, prospective, observational cohort study.

SETTING:

Navajo and White Mountain Apache Indian reservations, including 6 hospitals on the Navajo reservation and 1 on the White Mountain Apache reservation.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 1169 mother-infant pairs with mothers who delivered an infant during 1 of 3 influenza seasons.

MAIN EXPOSURE:

Maternal seasonal influenza vaccination.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

In infants, laboratory-confirmed influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), ILI hospitalization, and influenza hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers.

RESULTS:

A total of 1160 mother-infant pairs had serum collected and were included in the analysis. Among infants, 193 (17%) had an ILI hospitalization, 412 (36%) had only an ILI outpatient visit, and 555 (48%) had no ILI episodes. The ILI incidence rate was 7.2 and 6.7 per 1000 person-days for infants born to unvaccinated and vaccinated women, respectively. There was a 41% reduction in the risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection (relative risk, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.93) and a 39% reduction in the risk of ILI hospitalization (relative risk, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.84) for infants born to influenza-vaccinated women compared with infants born to unvaccinated mothers. Infants born to influenza-vaccinated women had significantly higher hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers at birth and at 2 to 3 months of age than infants of unvaccinated mothers for all 8 influenza virus strains investigated.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal influenza vaccination was significantly associated with reduced risk of influenza virus infection and hospitalization for an ILI up to 6 months of age and increased influenza antibody titers in infants through 2 to 3 months of age.

PMID:
20921345
DOI:
10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.192
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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