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Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan;34(1):174-6. doi: 10.2337/dc10-0709. Epub 2010 Oct 4.

Exercise-induced changes in metabolic intermediates, hormones, and inflammatory markers associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity.

Author information

1
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. huffm007@mc.duke.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To understand relationships between exercise training-mediated improvements in insulin sensitivity (S(I)) and changes in circulating concentrations of metabolic intermediates, hormones, and inflammatory mediators.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Targeted mass spectrometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to quantify metabolic intermediates, hormones, and inflammatory markers at baseline, after 6 months of exercise training, and 2 weeks after exercise training cessation (n = 53). A principal components analysis (PCA) strategy was used to relate changes in these intermediates to changes in S(I).

RESULTS:

PCA reduced the number of intermediates from 90 to 24 factors composed of biologically related components. With exercise training, improvements in S(I) were associated with reductions in by-products of fatty acid oxidation and increases in glycine and proline (P < 0.05, R² = 0.59); these relationships were retained 15 days after cessation of exercise training (P < 0.05, R² = 0.34).

CONCLUSIONS:

These observations support prior observations in animal models that exercise training promotes more efficient mitochondrial β-oxidation and challenges current hypotheses regarding exercise training and glycine metabolism.

PMID:
20921216
PMCID:
PMC3005483
DOI:
10.2337/dc10-0709
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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