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BMJ. 2010 Oct 4;341:c4978. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c4978.

Association of bacteria and viruses with wheezy episodes in young children: prospective birth cohort study.

Author information

1
The Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood, Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and The Danish Pediatric Asthma Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Ledreborg Allé 34, DK-2820 Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. Bisgaard@copsac.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the association between wheezy symptoms in young children and the presence of bacteria in the airways.

DESIGN:

Birth cohort study.

SETTING:

Clinical research unit in Copenhagen.

PARTICIPANTS:

Children of asthmatic mothers, from age 4 weeks to 3 years, with planned visits and acute admissions to the research clinic.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Frequency of bacteria and virus carriage in airway aspirates during wheezy episodes and at planned visits without respiratory symptoms.

RESULTS:

984 samples (361 children) were analysed for bacteria, 844 (299 children) for viruses, and 696 (277 children) for both viruses and bacteria. Wheezy episodes were associated with both bacterial infection (odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.3; P<0.001) and virus infection (2.8, 1.7 to 4.4; P<0.001). The associations of bacteria and viruses were independent of each other.

CONCLUSION:

Acute wheezy episodes in young children were significantly associated with bacterial infections similar to but independent of the association with virus infections.

PMID:
20921080
PMCID:
PMC2950260
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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