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Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2010 Nov;16(4):187-93. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2010.05.007. Epub 2010 Jun 12.

A randomised controlled trial of yoga for the treatment of chronic low back pain: results of a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, SRB Area 4, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom. hc18@york.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct a pilot trial of yoga for the treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP) to inform the feasibility and practicality of conducting a full-scale trial in the UK; and to assess the efficacy of yoga for the treatment of chronic low back pain.

DESIGN:

A pragmatic randomised controlled trial was undertaken comparing yoga to usual care.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty participants who had presented to their GP with chronic low back pain in the previous 18 months were recruited via GP records from one practice in York, UK.

INTERVENTIONS:

Twenty patients were randomised to either 12 weekly 75-min sessions of specialised yoga plus written advice, or usual care plus written advice. Allocation was 50/50.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Recruitment rate, levels of intervention attendance, and loss to follow-up were the main non-clinical outcomes. Change as measured by the Roland and Morris disability questionnaire was the primary clinical outcome. Changes in the Aberdeen back pain scale, SF-12, EQ-5D, and pain self-efficacy were secondary clinical outcomes. Data were collected via postal questionnaire at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks follow-up.

RESULTS:

Of the 286 patients identified from the GP database, 52 (18%) consented and returned the eligibility questionnaire, out of these 20 (6.9%) were eligible and randomised. The total percentage of patients randomised from the GP practice population was 0.28%. Ten patients were randomised to yoga, receiving an average of 1.7 sessions (range 0-5), and 10 were randomised to usual care. At 12 weeks follow-up data was received from 60% of patients in the yoga group and 90% of patients in the usual care group (75% overall). No significant differences were seen between groups in clinical outcomes apart from on the Aberdeen back pain scale at four weeks follow-up where the yoga group reported significantly less pain.

CONCLUSION:

This pilot study provided useful data and information to inform the design and development of a full-scale trial of yoga for CLBP in the UK. A key finding is the calculation of GP practice total list size required for patient recruitment in a full-scale trial, and the need to implement methods to increase class attendance.

PMID:
20920800
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2010.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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