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Obes Surg. 2011 Oct;21(10):1564-9. doi: 10.1007/s11695-010-0283-z.

Physical activity in gastric bypass patients: associations with weight loss and psychosocial functioning at 12-month follow-up.

Author information

1
VA Connecticut Healthcare System, 950 Campbell Ave. Psychology 116B, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. patricia.rosenberger@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined self-reported frequency and intensity of physical activity in gastric bypass patients, and the relationship between physical activity and weight loss and psychosocial outcomes during 12-month postoperative follow-up.

METHODS:

Participants were 131 obese patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery and completed psychometrically established measures assessing physical activity, depression, and physical and mental health preoperatively and at a 12-month follow-up assessment.

RESULTS:

Preoperatively, 62.6% of patients reported at least one episode of a minimum of 15 minutes of physical activity per week. This figure increased to 92.4% at 12-month postoperative follow-up. Both the frequency and intensity levels of physical activity episodes increased significantly from preoperative to 12-month postoperative assessments. Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for demographic variables and preoperative body mass index (BMI), revealed that the intensity of physical activity was significantly associated with postoperative weight loss at 12-month follow-up. Both the frequency and intensity of physical activity were significantly associated with depression, and physical and mental well-being at the 12-month postoperative follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

Gastric bypass patients increase both the frequency and intensity of their physical activity during the first 12 months postoperatively. Higher postoperative intensity levels of physical activity are associated with better weight loss outcomes while both increased frequency and intensity levels of physical activity are associated with better psychosocial outcomes.

PMID:
20890771
PMCID:
PMC3652016
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-010-0283-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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