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Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2011 Sep;79(3):302-7. doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2010.08.004. Epub 2010 Dec 15.

Influence of geriatric consultation with comprehensive geriatric assessment on final therapeutic decision in elderly cancer patients.

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1
Department of Geriatrics, Hôpital Charles Foix, Ivry sur Seine, France.

Abstract

Elderly patients represent a heterogeneous population in which decisions on cancer treatment are often difficult. The present study aims to report a 2-year period of the activity of geriatric assessment consultations and the impact on treatment decisions. Since January 2007, we have systematically carried out geriatric consultations, using well-known international scales, for elderly patients in whom treatment decisions appear complex to oncologists. From January 2007 to November 2008, 161 patients (57 men, 104 women; median age 82.4 years, range 73-97) were seen at geriatric consultations. Most of the patients (134/161) were undergoing first-line treatment and cancer was metastatic in 86 patients (53%). Geriatric assessment found severe comorbidities (grade 3 or 4 in CIRS-G scale) in 75 patients, dependence for at least one activity of daily living (ADL) in 52 patients, cognitive impairment in 42 patients, malnutrition in 104 patients (65%) and depression in 39 patients. According to the oncologists' prior decisions, there were no changes in treatment decisions in only 29 patients. Cancer treatment was changed in 79 patients (49%), including delayed therapy in 5 patients, less intensive therapy in 29 patients and more intensive therapy in 45 patients. Patients for whom the final decision was delayed or who underwent less intensive therapy had significantly more frequent severe comorbidities (23/34, p<0.01) and dependence for at least one ADL (19/34, p<0.01). In this study, we have found that comprehensive geriatric evaluation did significantly influence treatment decisions in 82% of our older cancer patients.

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