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Archaea. 2010 Sep 16;2010. pii: 820681. doi: 10.1155/2010/820681.

Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

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1
Institute for Molecular Biosciences, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany. soppa@bio.uni-frankfurt.de

Abstract

Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

PMID:
20885971
PMCID:
PMC2946573
DOI:
10.1155/2010/820681
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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