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J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Oct;52(10):977-81. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181f26e72.

Occupational factors associated with 4-year weight gain in Australian adults.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia. cmagee@uow.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This article examined whether occupational factors predicted 4-year change in body mass index (BMI) in a sample of full-time Australian employees.

METHODS:

Data from 1670 full-time Australian employees were collected through the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine whether several occupational factors at baseline predicted changes in BMI at 4-year follow up; several health and demographic covariates were controlled.

RESULTS:

Inflexible working hours (odds ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [1.14 to 2.09]) and weekend work (odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval [1.04 to 1.68]) significantly predicted increased BMI.

CONCLUSIONS:

This article demonstrates that certain occupational factors (ie, inflexible work hours and weekend work) significantly predicted increased BMI. Targeting these factors may play a role in combating obesity and related health problems among employees.

PMID:
20881630
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181f26e72
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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