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Health Serv Res. 2011 Feb;46(1 Pt 1):232-42. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2010.01181.x. Epub 2010 Sep 28.

Getting physicians to respond: the impact of incentive type and timing on physician survey response rates.

Author information

1
Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. james.katherine@mayo.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the effects of payment timing, form of payment, and requiring a social security number (SSN) on survey response rates.

DATA SOURCE:

Third-wave mailing of a U.S. physician survey.

STUDY DESIGN:

Nonrespondents were randomized to receive immediate U.S.$25 cash, immediate U.S.$25 check, promised U.S.$25 check, or promised U.S.$25 check requiring an SSN.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

Paper survey responses were double entered into statistical software.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Response rates differed significantly between remuneration groups (χ(3) (2) = 80.1, p<.0001), with the highest rate in the immediate cash group (34 percent), then immediate check (20 percent), promised check (10 percent), and promised check with SSN (8 percent).

CONCLUSIONS:

Immediate monetary incentives yield higher response rates than promised in this population of nonresponding physicians. Promised incentives yield similarly low response rates regardless of whether an SSN is requested.

PMID:
20880042
PMCID:
PMC3034272
DOI:
10.1111/j.1475-6773.2010.01181.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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