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Stroke. 2010 Oct;41(10 Suppl):S147-51. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.595777.

Early experience of translating pH-weighted MRI to image human subjects at 3 Tesla.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Mass 02129, USA. pzhesun@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

In acute stroke, mismatch between lesions seen on diffusion- (DWI) and perfusion-weighted (PWI) MRI has been used to identify ischemic tissue before irreversible damage. Nevertheless, the concept of PWI/DWI mismatch is oversimplified and the ischemic tissue metabolic status and outcome are often heterogeneous. Tissue pH, a well-regulated physiological index that alters on disrupted tissue metabolism, may provide a surrogate metabolic imaging marker that augments the DWI and PWI for penumbra imaging.

METHODS:

pH-weighted MRI was obtained by probing the pH-dependent amide proton transfer between endogenous mobile proteins/peptides and tissue water. The technique was validated using animal stroke models, optimized for human use, and preliminarily tested for imaging healthy volunteers.

RESULTS:

pH-weighted MRI is sensitive and specific to ischemic tissue acidosis. pH MRI can be optimized for clinical use, and a pilot human study showed it is feasible using a standard 3 Tesla MRI scanner.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ischemic acidosis can be imaged via an endogenous pH-weighted MRI technique, which complements conventional PWI and DWI for penumbra imaging. pH-weighted MRI has been optimized and appears feasible and practical in imaging human subjects. Additional study is necessary to elucidate the diagnostic use of pH MRI in stroke patients.

PMID:
20876492
PMCID:
PMC2956603
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.595777
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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