Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Crit Care. 2011 Apr;26(2):224.e9-13. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2010.07.011. Epub 2010 Sep 24.

Global end-diastolic volume, serum osmolarity, and albumin are risk factors for increased extravascular lung water.

Author information

1
Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, 755-8505, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The transpulmonary thermodilution technique allows the determination of cardiac preload (global end-diastolic volume index) and quantification of pulmonary edema (extravascular lung water index [EVLWI]). Pulmonary edema commonly develops in critically ill patients; however, the underlying pathophysiology, that is, hydrostatic (cardiac) or permeability-induced (noncardiac), often remains unclear. In this study, hemodynamic and serum parameters of osmolarity and oncotic pressure were analyzed to identify risk factors for increased EVLWI.

METHODS:

A retrospective, single-center analysis in an intensive care unit of a university hospital was performed. No interventions were made for the study. Forty-two critically ill patients were included, and 126 simultaneous hemodynamic measurements and serum determinations were analyzed by logistic regression and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis.

RESULTS:

Global end-diastolic volume index (P = .001), serum albumin (P = .006), and serum osmolarity (P = .029) were significant factors for increased EVLWI (defined as >10 mL/kg).

CONCLUSION:

Hypervolemia, hypoalbuminemia, and high plasma osmolarity are associated with increased EVLWI.

PMID:
20869838
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2010.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center