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Biochim Biophys Acta. 1978 Jul 3;541(3):360-71.

Follitropin receptors in rat testis. Characterization with enzymatically 125I-labeled human follitropin.

Abstract

The interaction between enzymatically radioiodinated human follitropin and the follitropin receptors in testis homogenate was investigated in immature and adult rats. The 125I-labeled human follitropin exhibited high binding activity with specific binding of up to 17% in the presence of an excess of testis homogenate. Approx. 50% of the bound hormone could be eluted at pH 5, and the receptor purified tracer exhibited a 3.6-fold increase in binding activity when compared with the original tracer preparation. Quantitative analysis of equilibrium binding data was performed with corrections for the measured specific activity and maximum binding activity of the tracer hormone. The equilibrium association constants (Ka) determined 24 degrees C were not significantly different in immature and adult rat testis, and the mean value for Ka was 3.9 . 10(9) M-1. At 37 degrees C, the Ka value obtained using immature rat testis was 1.3 . 10(10) M-1. The association of 125I-labeled human follitropin with immature rat testis homogenate was time and temperature dependent. In the presence of an excess of unlabeled hormone, 30--60% of the preformed hormone . receptor complex was dissociated after 24 h incubation. A specific and sensitive radioligand-receptor assay for follitropin was developed using immature rat testis homogenate. The minimum detectable dose of purified human follitropin was 0.6 ng, and human urinary and pituitary follitropin, ovine follitropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin reacted in the assay with equivalent slopes. The potencies of highly purified pregnent mare serum gonadotropin and highly purified human follitropin were similar in the radioligand-receptor assay, consistent with the follitropin bioactivity of the equine gonadotropin.

PMID:
208641
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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