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J Nutr. 2010 Nov;140(11):2008-13. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.122499. Epub 2010 Sep 22.

A lipid-based nutrient supplement but not corn-soy blend modestly increases weight gain among 6- to 18-month-old moderately underweight children in rural Malawi.

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1
Department of International Health, University of Tampere Medical School, Tampere 33014, Finland. cthakwalakwa@yahoo.com

Abstract

Although widely used, there is little information concerning the efficacy of corn-soy blend (CSB) supplementation in the treatment of moderate underweight in African children. Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS), which have proven to be beneficial treatment for severely wasted children, could offer benefits to less severely affected individuals. We conducted a clinical randomized trial to determine whether LNS or CSB supplementation improves weight gain of moderately underweight children. A total of 182 underweight [weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ) < -2] 6- to 15-mo-old children were randomized to receive for 12 wk a ration of 43 g/d LNS or 71 g/d CSB, providing 1189 and 921 kJ, respectively, or no supplementation (control). The primary outcome was weight change; secondary outcomes included changes in anthropometric indices, hemoglobin levels, and morbidity. The body weight increases (mean ± SD) did not differ and were 620 ± 470, 510 ± 350, and 470 ± 350 g in the LNS, CSB, and control groups, respectively (P = 0.11). Compared with controls, infants and children in the LNS group gained more weight [mean (95% CI) = 150 g (0-300 g); P = 0.05] and had a greater increase in WAZ [0.33 (-0.02-0.65); P = 0.04]. Weight and WAZ changes did not differ between the control and CSB groups. In exploratory stratified analysis, the weight increase was higher in the LNS group compared with the control group among those with lower initial WAZ [250 g (60-430 g; P = 0.01]. Supplementation with LNS but not CSB modestly increases weight gain among moderately underweight children and the effect appears most pronounced among those with a lower initial WAZ.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00420368.

PMID:
20861218
DOI:
10.3945/jn.110.122499
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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