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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Apr;9(4):320-5; quiz e36. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2010.09.006. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

Natural history of potential celiac disease in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics and European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food-Induced Diseases, University Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The presence of celiac disease-associated autoantibodies (antiendomysium and antitissue transglutaminase [anti-TG2]) with normal jejunal mucosa indicate potential celiac disease. We performed a prospective, 3-year cohort study to determine the natural history of potential celiac disease in children.

METHODS:

The study included 106 children with potential celiac disease, based on serology analysis and normal duodenal architecture. All but 2 carried the HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 haplotype. In all children, every 6 months, growth, nutritional parameters, celiac disease serology, and autoimmunity were investigated. In biopsies, γδ intraepithelial-, CD3-, and lamina propria CD25-positive cells were counted; duodenal deposits of anti-TG2 immunoglobulin A were detected. Biopsy analysis was repeated after 2 years on patients with persistent positive serology and/or symptoms.

RESULTS:

Celiac disease was detected primarily in first-degree relatives and patients with autoimmune disorders (40.6%). A gluten-free diet was prescribed to 20/106 patients because of symptoms, which were relieved in only 11. Eighty-nine of the 106 patients entered the follow-up study, with normal daily consumption of gluten. During the follow-up antibodies disappeared in 14.6% and fluctuated in 32.6%. Villous atrophy was observed in 12/39 patients (30.8%) who underwent a repeat biopsy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most children with potential celiac disease remain healthy. After 3 years, approximately 33% of patients develop villous atrophy. Intestinal deposits of anti-TG2 IgA identify children at risk for villous atrophy.

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PMID:
20851213
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2010.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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