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Virol J. 2010 Sep 16;7:238. doi: 10.1186/1743-422X-7-238.

High-risk HPV E5-induced cell fusion: a critical initiating event in the early stage of HPV-associated cervical cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Medical Science, Southeast University, Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009, PR China. gp_yaya@163.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cervical cancer is strongly associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and viral oncoproteins E5, E6 and E7 can transform cells by various mechanisms. It is proposed that oncogenic virus-induced cell fusion may contribute to oncogenesis if p53 or apoptosis is perturbed simultaneously. Recently, HPV-16 E5 was found to be necessary and sufficient for the formation of tetraploid cells, which are frequently found in precancerous cervical lesions and its formation is strongly associated with HPV state.

PRESENTATION OF THE HYPOTHESIS:

We propose that high-risk HPV E5-induced cell fusion is a critical initiating event in the early stage of HPV-associated cervical cancer.

TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS:

Our hypothesis can be tested by comparing the likelihood for colony formation or tumorigenic ability in nude mice between normal HaCaT cells expressing all three oncogenic proteins and E5-induced bi-nucleated HaCaT cells expressing E6 and E7. Moreover, investigating premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in HPV-positive and negative precancerous cervical cells is another way to assess this hypothesis.

IMPLICATION OF THE HYPOTHESIS:

This viewpoint would change our understanding of the mechanisms by which HPV induces cervical cancer. According to this hypothesis, blocking E5-induced cell fusion is a promising way to prevent the progression of cervical cancer. Additionally, establishment of a role of cell fusion in cervical carcinogenesis is of reference value for understanding the pathogenesis of other virus-associated cancers.

PMID:
20846406
PMCID:
PMC2949840
DOI:
10.1186/1743-422X-7-238
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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