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Mol Imaging Biol. 2011 Jun;13(3):399-410. doi: 10.1007/s11307-010-0420-z.

Tumor hypoxia imaging.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 31 Center Drive, Suite 1C14, Bethesda, MD, 20892-2281, USA.
2
Department of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150001, People's Republic of China.
3
Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 31 Center Drive, Suite 1C14, Bethesda, MD, 20892-2281, USA. niug@mail.nih.gov.
4
Imaging Sciences Training Program, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center and National Institute Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH, 9 Memorial Drive, 9/1W111, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. niug@mail.nih.gov.
5
Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 31 Center Drive, Suite 1C14, Bethesda, MD, 20892-2281, USA. shawn.chen@nih.gov.

Abstract

There is a need to measure tumor hypoxia in assessing the aggressiveness of tumor and predicting the outcome of therapy. A number of invasive and noninvasive techniques have been exploited to measure tumor hypoxia, including polarographic needle electrodes, immunohistochemical staining, radionuclide imaging (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence), and so on. This review article summarizes and discusses the pros and cons of each currently available method for measuring tissue oxygenation. Special emphasis was placed on noninvasive imaging hypoxia with emerging new agents and new imaging technologies to detect the molecular events that are relevant to tumor hypoxia.

PMID:
20838906
DOI:
10.1007/s11307-010-0420-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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