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PLoS Genet. 2010 Sep 9;6(9):e1001099. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1001099.

Long- and short-term selective forces on malaria parasite genomes.

Author information

1
Bioinformatics Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Plasmodium parasites, the causal agents of malaria, result in more than 1 million deaths annually. Plasmodium are unicellular eukaryotes with small ∼23 Mb genomes encoding ∼5200 protein-coding genes. The protein-coding genes comprise about half of these genomes. Although evolutionary processes have a significant impact on malaria control, the selective pressures within Plasmodium genomes are poorly understood, particularly in the non-protein-coding portion of the genome. We use evolutionary methods to describe selective processes in both the coding and non-coding regions of these genomes. Based on genome alignments of seven Plasmodium species, we show that protein-coding, intergenic and intronic regions are all subject to purifying selection and we identify 670 conserved non-genic elements. We then use genome-wide polymorphism data from P. falciparum to describe short-term selective processes in this species and identify some candidate genes for balancing (diversifying) selection. Our analyses suggest that there are many functional elements in the non-genic regions of these genomes and that adaptive evolution has occurred more frequently in the protein-coding regions of the genome.

PMID:
20838588
PMCID:
PMC2936524
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1001099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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