Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Blood. 2010 Dec 23;116(26):6123-32. doi: 10.1182/blood-2010-06-292391. Epub 2010 Sep 13.

Autologous nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with severe anti-TNF refractory Crohn disease: long-term follow-up.

Author information

1
Division of Immunotherapy, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. rburt@northwestern.edu

Abstract

We evaluated the safety and clinical outcome of autologous nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with severe Crohn disease (CD) defined as a Crohn Disease Activity Index (CDAI) greater than 250, and/or Crohn Severity Index greater than 16 despite anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. Stem cells were mobilized from the peripheral blood using cyclophosphamide (2.0 g/m(2)) and G-CSF (10 μg/kg/day), enriched ex vivo by CD34(+) selection, and reinfused after immune suppressive conditioning with cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) and either equine antithymocyte globulin (ATG, 90 mg/kg) or rabbit ATG (6 mg/kg). Eighteen of 24 patients are 5 or more years after transplantation. All patients went into remission with a CDAI less than 150. The percentage of clinical relapse-free survival defined as the percent free of restarting CD medical therapy after transplantation is 91% at 1 year, 63% at 2 years, 57% at 3 years, 39% at 4 years, and 19% at 5 years. The percentage of patients in remission (CDAI < 150), steroid-free, or medication-free at any posttransplantation evaluation interval more than 5 years after transplantation has remained at or greater than 70%, 80%, and 60%, respectively. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT0027853.

PMID:
20837778
DOI:
10.1182/blood-2010-06-292391
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center