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Am J Surg. 2011 Feb;201(2):149-56. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2010.02.012. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Evolution of locoregional treatment for peritoneal carcinomatosis: single-center experience of 308 procedures of cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

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1
Department of Surgery, University of New South Wales, St George Hospital, Kogarah, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Peritoneal carcinomatosis imposes an enormous clinical burden to the oncologic community. This study reports the patterns of care of the locoregional approach of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy as a curative procedure for peritoneal carcinomatosis from the experience of a single tertiary center in Australia.

METHODS:

We performed a review of clinical records from a prospective database of patients who were treated at the St George Hospital Peritoneal Surface Malignancy Program according to a standard protocol.

RESULTS:

A total of 308 CRS were performed in 249 patients with peritoneal surface malignancy; the mean age was 53 years and 55% were women. Over the years, we expanded the age limit for treatment (P = .03), reduced intensive care unit stays (P = .04), reduced amount of blood transfusion (P = .03), treated patients with a higher peritoneal cancer index (P < .001), achieved higher rates of complete cytoreduction (P = .003), increased use of PIC (P < .001), and improved complication rate (P = .02) and mortality rate (P = .01). The median survival of patients treated over the years also improved (P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

We show the maturity of the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis with CRS and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy in our institution after an initial learning curve with expansion of the selection criteria, improved perioperative outcomes, improved surgical results, and long-term survival outcomes.

PMID:
20832051
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2010.02.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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