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J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2010 Sep;5(3):31-41. doi: 10.1525/jer.2010.5.3.31.

Researcher perspectives on disclosure of incidental findings in genetic research.

Author information

1
University of Washington's Institute of Public Health Genetics Master of Public Health program, Seattle, WA 98195-7120, USA.

Abstract

Genetic research can produce information that is beyond the aims of the research study yet may be of clinical or personal interest to study participants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 44 researchers who were asked to describe how they would respond to a hypothetical vignette regarding the disclosure of findings with unanticipated clinical significance to research study participants. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content and thematic analyses. Researchers' decision-making processes about whether to disclose incidental findings were governed by potentially conflicting duties in three primary domains: information quality, adherence to rules, and participant welfare. There are several actions researchers can take to prepare for incidental findings, including: adding specific language in informed consent documents to state clearly how investigators will handle disclosure; exploring how prepared participants might be during the consent process to make decisions about how they would like to be approached in the event of incidental findings; developing procedures for appropriately communicating individual results and providing follow-up support based on participant preferences; and, in genetic research, having an awareness of the range of traits expressed by the genes under study.

PMID:
20831419
PMCID:
PMC3413406
DOI:
10.1525/jer.2010.5.3.31
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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