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Psychiatry Res. 2011 Apr 30;186(2-3):390-6. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2010.08.006. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Association between daily environmental temperature and suicide mortality in Korea (2001-2005).

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1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-724, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Little attention has been paid to whether temperature is associated with suicide and to whether suicide seasonality appears in Asian countries as shown in Western countries, even though suicide rates in Korea have increased steadily. The goal of the present study was to examine the association between daily temperature and daily suicide rate in Korea, taking gender, age, and education level into account. Data were analyzed using a generalized additive model, adjusting for confounding factors such as sunshine, relative humidity, holidays, and long-term trends. Suicide rates were higher in spring and summer than other seasons. We observed a 1.4% increase (95% confidence interval=1.0-1.7%) in suicide with each 1°C-increase in daily mean temperature. The suicide risks related to the temperature for males, elderly people, and those with less education were higher than for females, younger people, and those with more education, respectively. These findings have confirmed that temperature is associated with suicide in Korea and further our understanding of more susceptible groups, the effects of gender, age, and education level. Therefore, temperature, one of the meteorological factors, is an important risk factor on suicide.

PMID:
20828832
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2010.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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