Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr. 2011 Feb;158(2):201-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.07.050. Epub 2010 Sep 9.

Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration is associated with the metabolic syndrome among US youth aged 12-19 years.

Author information

1
Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. cli@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the hypothesis that the concentration of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) is associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in youth.

STUDY DESIGN:

Data on children and adolescents aged 12-19 years (n = 2734) from the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Depending on the definition of MetS used, the mean non-HDL-C concentration among youth with MetS ranged from 144.2 to 155.8 mg/dL, compared with 108.8-109.1 mg/dL in those without MetS (all P < .001). The MetS prevalence ranged from 6.9% to 11.7% in youth with a non-HDL-C concentration of 120-144 mg/dL and from 21.5% to 23.4% in those with a concentration ≥ 145 mg/dL-both significantly higher than the prevalence of 1.9%-3.4% in youth with a concentration <120 mg/dL (all P < .001). After adjustment for potential confounders, youth with a non-HDL-C concentration ≥ 120 mg/dL or ≥ 145 mg/dL were about 3 or 4 times more likely to have MetS compared with those with a non-HDL-C <120 mg/dL or <145 mg/dL (all P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Fasting non-HDL-C concentration was strongly associated with MetS in US youth. Our results support the use of non-HDL-C thresholds of 120 mg/dL and 145 mg/dL to indicate borderline and high MetS risk, respectively.

PMID:
20828715
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.07.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center