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Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct;92(4):960-6. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29598. Epub 2010 Sep 8.

Coffee, tea, and alcohol intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in African American women.

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1
Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Numerous studies have reported inverse associations of coffee, tea, and alcohol intake with risk of type 2 diabetes, but none has reported results separately among African American women.

OBJECTIVE:

We prospectively examined the relation of coffee, tea, and alcohol consumption to diabetes risk in African American women.

DESIGN:

The study included 46,906 Black Women's Health Study participants aged 30-69 y at baseline in 1995. Dietary intake was assessed in 1995 and 2001 by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. During 12 y of follow-up, there were 3671 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for diabetes risk factors.

RESULTS:

Multivariable RRs for intakes of 0-1, 1, 2-3, and ≥4 cups of caffeinated coffee/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.04), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.01), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.93), and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.01), respectively (P for trend = 0.003). Multivariable RRs for intakes of 1-3, 4-6, 7-13, and ≥14 alcoholic drinks/wk relative to never consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.00), 0.68 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.81), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.96), and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.98), respectively (P for trend < 0.0001). Intakes of decaffeinated coffee and tea were not associated with risk of diabetes.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that African American women who drink moderate amounts of caffeinated coffee or alcohol have a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
20826625
PMCID:
PMC2937592
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.2010.29598
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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