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Am J Emerg Med. 2011 Mar;29(3):278-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2009.09.034. Epub 2010 Mar 26.

Venous thromboembolic disease in the HIV-infected patient.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Washington Hospital Center/Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC 20010, USA. jasminemalekmd@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Infection with the HIV has developed into a chronic illness, with longer-term complications increasingly being seen. There is increasing evidence that infection with HIV may be associated with a hypercoagulable state. This study examines the association of HIV infection with the incidence of both pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis.

METHODS:

This study was a weighted analysis of data from National Hospital Discharge Survey, a national annual probability survey of discharges from short-stay non-Federal hospitals, from 1996-2004. The risk of pulmonary embolism and/or deep venous thrombosis in an HIV+ individual was ascertained for each age group by calculation of an odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). A common OR was computed across strata to evaluate the overall association between PE/DVT and HIV while adjusting for effects of age.

RESULTS:

The overall age-adjusted OR indicates a statistically significant increase of 43% for PE in HIV+ individuals as opposed to HIV- individuals (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.39-1.46). This increase differs by age group, with age group 21 to 50 years having the highest odds for PE among HIV+ individuals (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.54-1.63).

CONCLUSIONS:

The data supports the hypothesis that HIV-infected individuals are more likely to have clinically detected thromboembolic disease as opposed to non-HIV-infected individuals. This study reveals up to a 43% increase in OR of developing a PE, 10% increase in developing a DVT, and 40% increase in developing PE or DVT in an HIV-infected individual over the 9-year study period after adjusting for age.

PMID:
20825798
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2009.09.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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