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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Dec;64(12):1457-64. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2010.176. Epub 2010 Sep 8.

High serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with a favorable serum lipid profile.

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1
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are related to increased mortality. One possible explanation could be an association between serum 25(OH)D and serum lipids.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The study was performed at the University of Tromsø, Northern Norway. In total, 8018 nonsmoking and 2087 smoking subjects were included in a cross-sectional study performed in 2008, and 1762 nonsmoking and 397 smoking subjects in a longitudinal study from 1994/1995 to 2008. Nonfasting serum 25(OH)D, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and triacylglycerol (TAG) were measured.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for gender, age, sample month and body mass index in the cross-sectional study, there was a significant increase in serum TC, HDL-C and LDL-C, and a significant decrease in serum LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and TAG across increasing serum 25(OH)D quartiles. For serum HDL-C and TAG in nonsmokers the differences between the means for the highest and lowest serum 25(OH)D quartiles were 6.0 and 18.5%, respectively. In the longitudinal study, an increase in serum 25(OH)D was associated with a significant decrease in serum TAG.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a cross-sectional association between serum 25(OH)D and serum lipids, and a longitudinal association over 14 years between serum 25(OH)D and TAG, which may contribute to explain the relation between low serum 25(OH)D concentrations and mortality.

PMID:
20823896
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2010.176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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