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Cardiovasc Res. 2011 Jan 1;89(1):31-40. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvq285. Epub 2010 Sep 6.

Angiotensin II blockade: a strategy to slow ageing by protecting mitochondria?

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1
Center of Hypertension, Cardiology Department, Austral University Hospital, Derqui, Argentina.

Abstract

Protein and lipid oxidation-mainly by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS)-was proposed as a crucial determinant of health and lifespan. Angiotensin II (Ang II) enhances ROS production by activating NAD(P)H oxidase and uncoupling endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Ang II also stimulates mtROS production, which depresses mitochondrial energy metabolism. In rodents, renin-angiotensin system blockade (RAS blockade) increases survival and prevents age-associated changes. RAS blockade reduces mtROS and enhances mitochondrial content and function. This suggests that Ang II contributes to the ageing process by prompting mitochondrial dysfunction. Since Ang II is a pleiotropic peptide, the age-protecting effects of RAS blockade are expected to involve a variety of other mechanisms. Caloric restriction (CR)-an age-retarding intervention in humans and animals-and RAS blockade display a number of converging effects, i.e. they delay the manifestations of hypertension, diabetes, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, and cancer; increase body temperature; reduce body weight, plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1; ameliorate insulin sensitivity; lower protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation, and mitochondrial H(2)O(2) production; and increase uncoupling protein-2 and sirtuin expression. A number of these overlapping effects involve changes in mitochondrial function. In CR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) seem to contribute to age-retardation partly by regulating mitochondrial function. RAS inhibition up-regulates PPARs; therefore, it is feasible that PPAR modulation is pivotal for mitochondrial protection by RAS blockade during rodent ageing. Other potential mechanisms that may underlie RAS blockade's mitochondrial benefits are TGF-β down-regulation and up-regulation of Klotho and sirtuins. In conclusion, the available data suggest that RAS blockade deserves further research efforts to establish its role as a potential tool to mitigate the growing problem of age-associated chronic disease.

PMID:
20819950
DOI:
10.1093/cvr/cvq285
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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