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Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Jul;84(1):111-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.07.032. Epub 2010 Sep 3.

Preferences and experiences of chronically ill and disabled patients regarding shared decision-making: does the type of care to be decided upon matter?

Author information

1
NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), The Netherlands. a.brink-muinen@planet.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

(1) To describe the importance chronically ill and disabled patients attach to involvement in decision-making when various care types are considered, and (2) to analyse the degree to which these patients are involved in shared decision-making (SDM) regarding these care types, and whether their involvement reflects the importance they attach to SDM.

METHODS:

The study sample consisted of 812 chronically ill and disabled patients who experienced a situation of decision-making during the last year. Data were collected by a self-report survey in 2006 and were analysed by multilevel linear regression analyses.

RESULTS:

Participants attached most importance to SDM when occupational healthcare issues were at stake, but perceived their actual involvement in these decisions as relatively low. Patients dealing with decision-making regarding medical care or home care experienced higher levels of involvement. The importance attached to SDM corresponds moderately with the actual role patients experience in the decision-making process.

CONCLUSION:

The type of care to decide upon impacts on the importance patients attach to SDM as well as on their actual involvement in decision-making.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

We suggest healthcare practitioners to pay attention to the preferred level of patient involvement each time a new care issue has to be decided upon.

PMID:
20817453
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2010.07.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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