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Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Dec 1;68(11):1073-6. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.07.015.

A preliminary study of D-cycloserine augmentation of cognitive-behavioral therapy in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Rothman Center for Neuropsychiatry, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. estorch@health.usf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research on the neural circuitry underlying fear extinction has led to the examination of D-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the amygdala, as a method to enhance exposure therapy outcome. Preliminary results have supported the use of DCS to augment exposure therapy in adult anxiety disorders; however, no data have been reported in any childhood anxiety disorder. Thus, we sought to preliminarily examine whether weight-adjusted DCS doses (25 or 50 mg) enhanced the overall efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

METHOD:

Participants were 30 youth (aged 8-17) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. The study design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled augmentation trial examining CBT + DCS versus CBT + Placebo (15 youth per group). All patients received seven exposure and response prevention sessions paired with DCS or placebo taken 1 hour before sessions.

RESULTS:

Although not significantly different, compared with the CBT + Placebo group, youth in the CBT + DCS arm showed small-to-moderate treatment effects (d = .31-.47 on primary outcomes). No adverse events were recorded.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results complement findings in adult OCD and non-OCD anxiety disorders and provide initial support for a more extensive study of DCS augmentation of CBT among youth with OCD.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00864123.

PMID:
20817153
PMCID:
PMC3034091
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.07.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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