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Prev Med. 2010 Nov;51(5):408-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.08.014. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Cardiovascular risk according to educational status in India.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, India. rajeevg@satyam.net.in

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Influence of socioeconomic status on cardiovascular risk has not been well studied in low income countries. To determine risks in various educational status (ES) subjects we performed a study in India.

METHODS:

Epidemiological study was performed in years 1999-2003 in Jaipur (India) for coronary risk factors among 1280 adults 20-59 years (men 619, women 661). ES was categorized into low (education ≤5 years); middle (6-12 years) and high (>12 years). Prevalence of risk factors and Framingham risk scores were determined.

RESULTS:

Low ES was in 306, middle in 436 and high in 538. In low, middle and high ES respectively age-adjusted prevalence (%) of smoking was 19.0, 19.3, and 11.7; obesity 9.5, 16.7, and 22.1, hypertension 15.3, 30.5, and 44.0; hypercholesterolemia ≥200mg/dl 46.0, 48.4, and 54.6; low HDL cholesterol <40mg/dl 46.4, 56.4, and 38.3; metabolic syndrome 20.9, 25.7, and 28.6; and diabetes 6.9, 5.5, and 26.4. Framingham risk score was 5.7±4.8, 6.3±5.7 and 4.7±5.1 and calculated cardiovascular risk probability 5.2±5.7, 6.8±7.8 and 5.2±6.0 (P(trend)<0.05). Framingham risk score was significantly greater in low and middle ES (6.1±5.3) compared to high (4.7±5.1) (p<0.001). Adjustment for smoking attenuated the risk.

CONCLUSION:

Low and middle educational status urban subjects in India have greater cardiovascular risk.

PMID:
20817021
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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