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Nat Cell Biol. 2010 Sep;12(9):814-22. doi: 10.1038/ncb0910-814.

Eaten alive: a history of macroautophagy.

Author information

1
Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2216, USA.

Abstract

Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy), or 'self-eating', is a conserved cellular pathway that controls protein and organelle degradation, and has essential roles in survival, development and homeostasis. Autophagy is also integral to human health and is involved in physiology, development, lifespan and a wide range of diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial infection. Although research on this topic began in the late 1950s, substantial progress in the molecular study of autophagy has taken place during only the past 15 years. This review traces the key findings that led to our current molecular understanding of this complex process.

PMID:
20811353
PMCID:
PMC3616322
DOI:
10.1038/ncb0910-814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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