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Kidney Int. 2011 Jan;79(2):169-78. doi: 10.1038/ki.2010.317. Epub 2010 Sep 1.

Renal tubular Fas ligand mediates fratricide in cisplatin-induced acute kidney failure.

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1
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic agent for many tumors, has an unfortunately common toxicity where almost a third of patients develop renal dysfunction after a single dose. Acute kidney injury caused by cisplatin depends on Fas-mediated apoptosis driven by Fas ligand (FasL) expressed on tubular epithelial and infiltrating immune cells. Since the role of FasL in T cells is known, we investigated whether its presence in primary kidney cells is needed for its toxic effect. We found that all cisplatin-treated wild-type (wt) mice died within 6 days; however, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/beige mice (B-, T-, and natural killer-cell-deficient) displayed a significant survival benefit, with only 55% mortality while exhibiting significant renal failure. Treating SCID/beige mice with MFL3, a FasL-blocking monoclonal antibody, completely restored survival after an otherwise lethal cisplatin dose, suggesting another source of FasL besides immune cells. Freshly isolated primary tubule segments from wt mice were co-incubated with thick ascending limb (TAL) segments freshly isolated from mice expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene (same genetic background) to determine whether FasL-mediated killing of tubular cells is an autocrine or paracrine mechanism. Cisplatin-stimulated primary segments induced apoptosis in the GFP-tagged TAL cells, an effect blocked by MFL3. Thus, our study shows that cisplatin-induced nephropathy is mediated through FasL, functionally expressed on tubular cells that are capable of inducing death of cells of adjacent tubules.

PMID:
20811331
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2010.317
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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