Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2010 Aug 23;5(8):e12351. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012351.

Glycosaminoglycan sulphation affects the seeded misfolding of a mutant prion protein.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. vlawson@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The accumulation of protease resistant conformers of the prion protein (PrP(res)) is a key pathological feature of prion diseases. Polyanions, including RNA and glycosaminoglycans have been identified as factors that contribute to the propagation, transmission and pathogenesis of prion disease. Recent studies have suggested that the contribution of these cofactors to prion propagation may be species specific.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING:

In this study a cell-free assay was used to investigate the molecular basis of polyanion stimulated PrP(res) formation using brain tissue or cell line derived murine PrP. Enzymatic depletion of endogenous nucleic acids or heparan sulphate (HS) from the PrP(C) substrate was found to specifically prevent PrP(res) formation seeded by mouse derived PrP(Sc). Modification of the negative charge afforded by the sulphation of glycosaminoglycans increased the ability of a familial PrP mutant to act as a substrate for PrP(res) formation, while having no effect on PrP(res) formed by wildtype PrP. This difference may be due to the observed differences in the binding of wild type and mutant PrP for glycosaminoglycans.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Cofactor requirements for PrP(res) formation are host species and prion strain specific and affected by disease associated mutations of the prion protein. This may explain both species and strain dependent propagation characteristics and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of familial prion disease. It further highlights the challenge of designing effective therapeutics against a disease which effects a range of mammalian species, caused by range of aetiologies and prion strains.

PMID:
20808809
PMCID:
PMC2925953
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0012351
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center