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Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):234-43. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.109.074633.

Role of media reports in completed and prevented suicide: Werther v. Papageno effects.

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1
Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. thomas.niederkrotenthaler@meduniwien.ac.at

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Media reporting of suicide has repeatedly been shown to trigger suicidal behaviour. Few studies have investigated the associations between specific media content and suicide rates. Even less is known about the possible preventive effects of suicide-related media content.

AIMS:

To test the hypotheses that certain media content is associated with an increase in suicide, suggesting a so-called Werther effect, and that other content is associated with a decrease in suicide, conceptualised as a Papageno effect. Further, to identify classes of media articles with similar reporting profiles and to test for associations between these classes and suicide.

METHOD:

Content analysis and latent class analysis (LCA) of 497 suicide-related print media reports published in Austria between 1 January and 30 June 2005. Ecological study to identify associations between media item content and short-term changes in suicide rates.

RESULTS:

Repetitive reporting of the same suicide and the reporting of suicide myths were positively associated with suicide rates. Coverage of individual suicidal ideation not accompanied by suicidal behaviour was negatively associated with suicide rates. The LCA yielded four classes of media reports, of which the mastery of crisis class (articles on individuals who adopted coping strategies other than suicidal behaviour in adverse circumstances) was negatively associated with suicide, whereas the expert opinion class and the epidemiological facts class were positively associated with suicide.

CONCLUSIONS:

The impact of suicide reporting may not be restricted to harmful effects; rather, coverage of positive coping in adverse circumstances, as covered in media items about suicidal ideation, may have protective effects.

PMID:
20807970
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.109.074633
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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