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Orthopedics. 2010 Jun 9;33(6):440. doi: 10.3928/01477447-20100429-29.

Unusual combination of posterior femoral head dislocation with anterior and posterior wall fractures in the ipsilateral acetabulum.

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1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, China.

Abstract

Although hip dislocation combined with acetabular fracture is not an uncommon injury, anterior acetabular wall fractures rarely occur in patients who have posterior fracture-dislocations of the hip. This article presents a unique case of anterior and posterior wall fractures of the ipsilateral acetabulum in a patient who sustained traumatic posterior hip dislocation that resulted from a high-speed motor vehicle accident. The initial imaging evaluation, which did not include the obturator oblique view, revealed no concomitant anterior acetabular wall fracture. Repeated manipulative reductions were unsuccessful in reducing the displaced hip joint. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans revealed the initially missed anterior acetabular wall fracture fragments incarcerated in the left hip joint in addition to the hip dislocation and the posterior acetabular wall fracture. The incarcerated bone fragments lay between the anterior wall and the femoral head, and between the posterior wall and the femoral head, which appeared to derive from both anterior and posterior acetabular walls, respectively. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed to manage the posterior dislocation and associated acetabular fractures. Intraoperatively, the major anterior wall fragment was used to reconstruct the defected posterior wall. This case highlights the necessity of suspicion and pre- and postoperative monitoring of the obturator oblique view and CT scans to detect the potentially existing anterior acetabular wall fracture. Early surgical intervention is important to guarantee satisfactory outcomes of such complex fracture-dislocation injuries.

PMID:
20806761
DOI:
10.3928/01477447-20100429-29
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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