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J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Sep;16(9):951-8. doi: 10.1089/acm.2009.0719.

Treatment of chronic low-back pain: a 1-year or greater follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. watsonjd@shaw.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Musculoskeletal disorders are the most frequent cause of physical disability in developed countries. In particular, lower back pain is very common and represents a significant burden both in terms of patient suffering and costs. It is important to determine the most effective and efficient interventions in the treatment of this condition.

PURPOSE:

This article presents clinical outcomes in patients with chronic lower back pain involving ligamentous pathology treated by a physician who specializes in injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal conditions and is able to tailor injection therapy specifically to each individual patient.

DESIGN:

As a retrospective case series, patients from outpatient clinics in both rural and one urban centre were assessed, treated, and had 1 year or more follow-up.

METHODS:

Patients were referred by their family physician for assessment for chronic lower back pain refractory to conventional medical management.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pain and quality of life (QoL) numeric (10 cm) analog scales (0 = no pain, 10 = the worst pain imaginable; 0 = best quality of life, 10 = worst quality of life) were administered pretreatment and 1 year or later after the last treatment.

RESULTS:

One hundred and ninety (190) patients were treated during the study period, June 1999-May 2006. Patients whose follow-up was 1 year or greater from the last treatment were included, leaving 140 patients available for data analysis. Both pain and QoL scores were significantly improved at least 1 year after the last treatment. There were no differences in outcomes as a result of age, response to Xylocaine (lidocaine) injection, insurance coverage, smoking history, or gender.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that prolotherapy using a variety of proliferants can be an effective treatment for low back pain from presumed ligamentous dysfunction for some patients when performed by a skilled practitioner.

PMID:
20804430
DOI:
10.1089/acm.2009.0719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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