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J Eval Clin Pract. 2011 Feb;17(1):7-11. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01342.x. Epub 2010 Aug 24.

Effect of feedback in promoting adherence to an exercise programme: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Healthcare Research, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan. masa-s@tkf.att.ne.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated whether providing participants in an exercise programme with regular feedback on their exercise progress affected their adherence to the programme regimen.

METHOD:

We conducted a randomized controlled trial. Adult men and women with borderline hypertension and a body mass index ≥ 25.0 were randomized to two intervention groups (groups A and B) and one control group (group C) and were prescribed regular aerobic exercise. During the 12-week study period, group A was provided with both feedback information on their exercise progress and a health letter, while group B was provided with the health letter only. The main outcome measure was exercise performance, per cent achievement of target exercise level (%) defined as the number of weeks during which the exercise target was reached divided by the number of weeks in the programme. Results were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test.

RESULTS:

A total of 105 study subjects were randomized into three groups (A, n = 37; B, n = 37 and C, n = 31). Per cent achievement of target exercise level during the 12-week period was highest in group A (26.5%), followed by groups B (22.9%) and C (17.4%) (P = 0.36). Subjects who received regular feedback during the exercise programme tended to have higher exercise performance.

CONCLUSIONS:

In improving adherence to exercise intervention, the provision of regular feedback to participants in an exercise programme may be an effective intervention.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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