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Addiction. 2010 Nov;105(11):1991-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03057.x. Epub 2010 Aug 24.

Effectiveness of a mood management component as an adjunct to a telephone counselling smoking cessation intervention for smokers with a past major depression: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

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  • 1STIVORO, Expert Centre on Tobacco Control, The Hague, the Netherlands. rvandermeer@stivoro.nl

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess whether the addition of a mood management component to telephone counselling produces higher abstinence rates in smokers with past major depression and helps to prevent recurrence of depressive symptoms.

DESIGN:

Pragmatic randomized controlled trial with two conditions, with follow-up at 6 and 12 months. The control intervention consisted of eight sessions of proactive telephone counselling. The mood management intervention was an integration of the control intervention with a mood management component. This component consisted of a self-help mood management manual, two more preparatory proactive telephone counselling sessions and supplementary homework assignments and advice.

SETTING:

Dutch national smoking cessation quitline.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 485 daily smokers with past major depression, according to the DSM-IV.

MEASUREMENTS:

The primary outcome measure was prolonged abstinence and secondary outcome measures were 7-day point prevalence abstinence and depressive symptoms.

FINDINGS:

The mood management intervention resulted in significantly higher prolonged abstinence rates at 6- and 12-month follow-up (30.5% and 23.9% in experimental condition, 22.3% and 14.0% in the control condition). The odds ratios were 1.60 (95% CI 1.06-2.42) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.22-3.14) for both follow-ups. The mood management intervention did not seem to prevent recurrence of depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adding a mood management component to telephone counselling for smoking cessation in smokers with a past major depression increases cessation rates without necessarily reducing depressive symptoms.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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