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Arq Bras Cardiol. 2010 Mar;94(3):308-12, 328-32.

Effects of short-term carvedilol on the cardiac sympathetic activity assessed by 123I-MIBG scintigraphy.

[Article in English, Portuguese]

Author information

1
Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ, Brazil. sandramarina@cardiol.br

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Autonomic alterations in heart failure are associated with an increase in morbimortality. Several noninvasive methods have been employed to evaluate the sympathetic function, including the Meta-Iodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy imaging of the heart.

OBJECTIVE:

to evaluate the cardiac sympathetic activity through 123I-MIBG scintigraphy, before and after three months of carvedilol therapy in patients with heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45%.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Sixteen patients, aged 56.3 +/- 12.6 years (11 males), with a mean LVEF of 28% +/- 8% and no previous use of beta-blockers were recruited for the study. Images of the heart innervation were acquired with 123I-MIBG, and the serum levels of catecholamines (epinephrine, dopamine and norepinephrine) were measured; the radioisotope ventriculography (RIV) was performed before and after a three-month therapy with carvedilol.

RESULTS:

Patients' functional class showed improvement: before the treatment, 50% of the patients were FC II and 50% were FC III. After 3 months, 7 patients were FC I (43.8%) and 9 were FC II (56.2%), (p = 0.0001). The mean LVEF assessed by RIV increased from 29% to 33% (p = 0.017). There was no significant variation in cardiac adrenergic activity assessed by 123I-MIBG (early and late resting images and washout rate). No significant variation was observed regarding the measurement of catecholamines.

CONCLUSION:

The short-term treatment with carvedilol promoted the clinical and LVEF improvement. However, this was not associated to an improvement in the cardiac adrenergic activity, assessed by 123I-MIBG scintigraphy, as well as the measurement of circulating catecholamines.

PMID:
20730258
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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