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Compr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep-Oct;51(5):504-9. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2009.12.001. Epub 2010 Feb 19.

A prospective study of the impact of smoking on outcomes in bipolar and schizoaffective disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, PO Box 281, Geelong VIC 3220, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tobacco smoking is more prevalent among people with mental illnesses, including bipolar disorder, than in the general community. Most data are cross-sectional, and there are no prospective trials examining the relationship of smoking to outcome in bipolar disorder. The impact of tobacco smoking on mental health outcomes was investigated in a 24-month, naturalistic, longitudinal study of 240 people with bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder.

METHOD:

Participants were interviewed and data recorded by trained study clinicians at 9 interviews during the study period.

RESULTS:

Comparisons were made between participants who smoked daily (n = 122) and the remaining study participants (n = 117). During the 24-month study period, the daily smokers had poorer scores on the Clinical Global Impressions-Depression (P = .034) and Clinical Global Impressions-Overall Bipolar (P = .026) scales and had lengthier stays in hospital (P = .012), compared with nonsmokers.

LIMITATIONS:

Smoking status was determined by self-report. Nicotine dependence was not measured.

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest that smoking is associated with poorer mental health outcomes in bipolar and schizoaffective disorder.

PMID:
20728008
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2009.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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