Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1902-1911.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.08.019. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume is associated with increased risk of erosive esophagitis in men and women.

Author information

1
Center for Cancer Prevention and Detection, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Data on the association between erosive esophagitis and obesity are inconsistent because of variations in study populations and methods used to determine obesity.

METHODS:

Participants in a prospective health-screening cohort underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography. The association between erosive esophagitis and obesity (measured by body mass index [BMI], waist circumference, and abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume) was estimated with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for confounding factors. We also analyzed the association between obesity and erosive esophagitis by sex.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 9.3% (495/5329). The OR for erosive esophagitis correlated with obesity measured by BMI, waist circumference, and abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume (P < .001 for each factor). The multivariate OR for erosive esophagitis was 1.97 (95% CI: 1.34-2.90) for a visceral adipose tissue volume of 500-999 cm(3), 2.27 (95% CI: 1.51-3.39) for 1000-1499 cm(3), and 2.94 (95% CI: 1.87-4.62) for ≥1500 cm(3), compared with participants who had visceral adipose tissue volumes less than 500 cm(3). When measures of obesity were analyzed simultaneously, abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume, but not BMI or waist circumference, was associated with erosive esophagitis. The 3 measures of obesity were significantly associated with erosive esophagitis in males, but only visceral adipose tissue volume was associated with erosive esophagitis in females (P = .002).

CONCLUSIONS:

In contrast to BMI or waist circumference, abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume is associated with an increased risk of erosive esophagitis in males and females.

PMID:
20727886
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2010.08.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center