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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2010 Nov;49(11):1044-9. doi: 10.1177/0009922810376234. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Traumatic brain injury in children and adolescents: surveillance for pituitary dysfunction.

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  • 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Children who sustain traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for developing hypopituitarism, of which growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is the most common manifestation.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of GHD and associated features following TBI among children and adolescents.

STUDY DESIGN:

A total of 32 children and adolescents were recruited from a pediatric TBI clinic. Participants were diagnosed with GHD based on insufficient growth hormone release during both spontaneous overnight testing and following arginine/glucagon administration.

RESULTS:

GHD was diagnosed in 5/32 participants (16%). Those with GHD exhibited more rapid weight gain following injury than those without GHD and had lower levels of free thyroxine and follicle-stimulating hormone. Males with GHD had lower testosterone levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

GHD following TBI is common in children and adolescents, underscoring the importance of assessing for GHD, including evaluating height and weight velocities after TBI. Children and adolescents with GHD may further exhibit absence or intermediate function for other pituitary hormones.

PMID:
20724335
DOI:
10.1177/0009922810376234
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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