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Curr Opin Hematol. 2010 Nov;17(6):544-9. doi: 10.1097/MOH.0b013e32833e5ac7.

Minority donation in the United States: challenges and needs.

Author information

1
New York Blood Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. bshaz@nybloodcenter.org

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

In the United States, blood donation rates of African-Americans are 25-50% of that of white individuals. As African-Americans make up an ever increasing and now substantial minority, and African-American recipients of blood transfusion, both specialized, such as sickle cell disease patients, and general hospitalized patients, have a better chance of receiving phenotype-matched or appropriate red blood cell units when there is a significant percentage of products in the inventory from African-American donors, it is important to understand the reason for the observed difference.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Possible reasons for this discrepancy in donation rates include increased rates of donor deferral and ineligibility; increased barriers to donation, such as fear and distrust; and different marketing and education strategies. Thus, to increase the blood availability to African-American recipients, the reasons for these donation rate differences must be better understood and subsequently addressed through improved blood donor recruitment programs. The majority of African-American donor recruitment programs have focused on donating for sickle cell disease patients, particularly children, which have been of limited success.

SUMMARY:

Significant improvements in African-American donor recruitment are needed to adequately meet the demand of African-American patients as well as the entire population.

PMID:
20717026
PMCID:
PMC3082202
DOI:
10.1097/MOH.0b013e32833e5ac7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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