Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Early Hum Dev. 2010 Sep;86(9):563-8. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2010.07.006. Epub 2010 Aug 15.

Risk profiles for overweight/obesity among preschoolers.

Author information

1
George Mason University, Department of Health Administration and Policy, MS 1J3, College of Health and Human Services, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030, United States. pkitsant@gmu.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The epidemic of overweight/obesity among U.S. children has led to an alarming increase in health-related consequences, including early-onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recent research has identified the independent contribution of several maternal and child factors to the development of childhood overweight/obesity. Few studies, however, have examined risk profiles of childhood obesity.

AIM:

This study used classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to examine the combined effect of maternal and child factors in generating risk profiles for overweight/obesity among preschoolers.

STUDY DESIGN:

Data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) study were used. The sample was comprised of preschool children. CART and logistic regression models were built and compared.

RESULTS:

Children who were overweight/obese at two years of age had an increased risk of being overweight/obese at four years of age. Children born to overweight/obese mothers were more likely to be overweight/obese by age four, even if their BMI at two years of age was normal. Children with high birth weight (> or = 4000 g.) were also more likely to be overweight/obese at age four years if they were born to mothers with a normal pregravid BMI, but were of a lower socioeconomic status. Among preschoolers whose mothers were black or white and who had a high pregravid BMI, breastfeeding duration and parity played an important role in determining their risk of being overweight/obese.

CONCLUSIONS:

Classification tree analysis confirms and extends current knowledge of preschool overweight/obesity by providing preliminary risk profiles that are structured within the context of prenatal and postnatal maternal and child characteristics.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center