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Addiction. 2010 Sep;105(9):1660-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03020.x.

Failure to improve cigarette smoking abstinence with transdermal selegiline + cognitive behavior therapy.

Author information

1
Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94303-1334, USA. jkillen@stanford.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine the effectiveness of transdermal selegiline for producing cigarette smoking abstinence.

DESIGN:

Adult smokers were randomly assigned to receive selegiline transdermal system (STS) or placebo given for 8 weeks. All participants received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Follow-ups were conducted at 25 and 52 weeks.

SETTING:

Community smoking cessation clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

243 adult smokers (> or =18 years of age; > or =10 cigarettes/day).

MEASURES:

Expired-air carbon monoxide confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence.

FINDINGS:

STS was not superior to placebo. More women than men were abstinent at 52 week follow-up (28% vs 16%, P < 0.05). Behavioral activation (BAS) moderated treatment response (P = 0.01). The survival rate through week 52 for those with high 'drive' scores on the BAS was 47% if assigned to selegiline and 34% if assigned to placebo. The survival rate for those with low 'drive scores' on the BAS was 35% if assigned to selegiline compared to 53% if assigned to placebo.

CONCLUSION:

Transdermal selegiline does not appear generally effective in aiding smoking cessation though there may be a selective effect in those smokers with low 'behavioral activation'.

PMID:
20707784
PMCID:
PMC3749242
DOI:
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03020.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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