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Thromb Res. 2010 Oct;126(4):e249-54. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2010.07.013. Epub 2010 Aug 11.

Associations between high factor VIII and low free protein S levels with traditional arterial thrombotic risk factors and their risk on arterial thrombosis: results from a retrospective family cohort study.

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1
Division of Haemostasis and Thrombosis, Department of Haematology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. r.mulder@lc.umcg.nl

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Whether high factor (F)VIII and low free protein S levels are risk factors for arterial thrombosis is unclarified.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

In a post-hoc analysis of a single-centre retrospective family cohort, we determined if these two proteins could increase the risk of arterial thrombosis. In total, 1399 relatives were analysed.

RESULTS:

Annual incidence in relatives with high FVIII levels was 0.29% (95%CI, 0.22-0.38) compared to 0.13% (95%CI, 0.09-0.19) in relatives with normal FVIII levels. In relatives with low free protein S levels, this risk was 0.26% (95%CI, 0.16-0.40), compared to 0.14% (95%CI, 0.10-0.20) in relatives with normal free protein S levels. Mean FVIII levels adjusted for age and sex were 11 IU/dL, 18 IU/dL, and 21 IU/dL higher in relatives with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity as compared to relatives without these arterial thrombotic risk factors. Moreover, a dose response relation between increasing FVIII and body mass index was found. None of these associations were shown for free protein S.

CONCLUSIONS:

High FVIII and low free protein S levels seemed to be mild risk factors for arterial thrombosis. High FVIII levels were particularly observed in relatives with traditional arterial thrombotic risk factors. Free protein S levels were not influenced by these thrombotic risk factors. This assumes that low free protein S levels were genetically determined.

PMID:
20705334
DOI:
10.1016/j.thromres.2010.07.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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